Fellowship Alumni

Alumni 2020/21

Name: Adam Abdalla
Course: Arabic and Politics at the University of Leeds

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? After completing the fellowship, I began an MPhil in Modern Middle Eastern Studies and Hebrew at the University of Oxford. I am also currently applying my experiences from the BP Fellowship in an editorial position at the Oxford Middle East Review journal, as well as working as a workshop facilitator with a HR educational organisation.

Click here to read about Adam’s project.

Name: Aimée-Stephanie Reid

Course: MSc Peace and Conflict Studies, Ulster University, Northern Ireland

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am currently working as a data engineer for Global Media and Entertainment in London.

Click here to read about Aimée-Stephanie’s project.

Name: Francesca Vawdrey
Course: Having specialised in Palestinian history during her undergraduate degree, Francesca is now a postgraduate in Modern Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Oxford.
What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? Having finished the fellowship, I am continuing the second year of my master’s in Modern Middle Eastern Studies at Oxford. I am now writing my thesis on sexuality and war in Palestinian women’s literature, whilst continuing to take classes in Arabic and the political economy of the Middle East, alongside an editorial position at the Oxford Middle East Review.

Click here to read about Francesca’s project.

Name: Gilang Al Ghifari Lukman
Course: MPhil Modern Middle Eastern Studies, Advanced Arabic and Introductory Hebrew at University of Oxford.
What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am currently working as a researcher at Control Risks, a political and security consulting firm headquartered in London. As the co-founder of Haifa Institute, I am regularly invited as a speaker in educational events on Israel-Palestine for an Indonesian audience.

 

Click here to read about Gilang’s project.

Name: Haneen Zeglam
Course: MPhil Modern Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Oxford

Why did you apply to the fellowship? I applied to the Fellowship because I really admire the Balfour Project Approach that highlights Britain’s responsibility to the future of Israel-Palestine, given its actions in the past. I also wanted to develop my own understanding through the various workshops and lectures, as well as getting to know the other fellows. Overall, it has been a massively rewarding programme so far and I would definitely encourage people to apply. 

Click here to read about Haneen’s project.

Name: Jack Walton
Course: University of Exeter, Politics Philosophy and Economics
Israeli occupation.

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am currently studying for a primary PGCE at the University of Cambridge.

 Click here to read about Jack’s project.

Name: Jordan Jones
Course: MSc Modern Middle Eastern Studies, University of Oxford

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? After the fellowship, I completed my MSc degree in Modern Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Oxford and I am now working as a researcher in the financial services sector. In my spare time, I continue to research issues relating to Israel-Palestine and advocate for a just resolution to the conflict.

Click here to read about Jordan’s project.

Name: Martha Scott-Cracknell
Course: Completed MSt in Study of Religions at the University of Oxford in July 2020 (studied BA Religion, Politics, and Society at University of Leeds).

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am continuing to work with the Balfour Project part time as a Programme’s Assistant, assisting in the recruiting and running of the 21/22 Fellowship Programme. I also work part-time as an analyst for the European Academy of Religion and Society.

 Click here to read about Martha’s project.

Name: Omar Sharif
Course: Cyber Security, CU London

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am in my final year completing a BSc at university and I am very active in creating awareness about the Israel Palestine conflict in the UK. One way I am doing this is through my involvement in organising events as a FODIP ambassador.

 

Click here to read about Omar’s project.

Name: Rosie Richards
Course: MA in Near and Middle Eastern Studies with Intensive Arabic at SOAS

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? Having graduated from her MA with a distinction, Rosie moved to Amman and has started working for a local NGO specialising in labour equality for Jordanian workers.

Click here to read about Rosie’s project.

Name: Ruth Foster
Course: MTS, Harvard Divinity School. Previously studied Religious Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

Why did you apply to the fellowship? I applied to the Balfour Project in order to learn more about both Britain’s historic role in the region, and its responsibility in future peace-building efforts. In addition to this through workshops, lectures, and interactions with the other Fellows I wanted to engage with a wide range of perspectives and further nuance and challenge my own understanding of the region.

Name: Sam Lytton Cobbold
Course: MA Hons Arabic & Middle Eastern Studies with French, Edinburgh University

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? Having completed the fellowship, I am studying for a MSc in Modern Middle Eastern Studies at St Antony’s college, University of Oxford, focusing on Politics and particularly Islam’s role in regional politics. Specifically, I am interested in the role of Islam in resistance politics, paying close attention to the case studies of Hamas and Hezbollah, and their resistance to Israel.

Click here to read about Sam’s project.

Name: Sarah Chaya Smith
Course: MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS, University of London. Previously studied Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh (2016-2020).
nd oppression.


What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I now work in UK Parliament as a Communications Officer, supporting the work of an MP in their day-to-day parliamentary work and constituency duties.

 Click here to read about Sarah’s project.

Name: Stav Salpeter
Course: Norwegian-Israeli currently studying for an MA (Hons) in International Relations and International Law at the University of Edinburgh. She co-founded the Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue Society, an award-winning organisation with branches across the UK and Canada.

What have you been doing since the 20/21 fellowship ended? I am currently completing my MA (Hons) in International Relations and International Law at the University of Edinburgh where I direct the EIJI International Law Clinic.”

Click here to read about Stav’s project.

Alumni 2019/20

Eleonor Lefvert is a masters student in Gender and International Law at SOAS, University of London, where she is specialising in gendered dimensions of security and armed conflict. Before moving to London, Eleonor worked in Ramallah, Palestine, as an intern and consultant at a women’s rights organisation in their international advocacy team. 

“Growing up with a grandfather who was Sten Andersson, the former Swedish minister of foreign affairs, deeply engaged in diplomacy with both parties, conversations about Israel/Palestine have always been present so this issue lies close to my heart.”

“These conversations influenced my commitment for human rights in general and a  peaceful process between Israel/Palestine in particular. 

“As a Peace Advocacy Fellow at the Balfour Project, I am focused on researching the Swedish recognition of Palestine, using this as a case study to inform a future British recognition of Palestine. I hope my research can give insights on key factors that led to Swedish recognition, and that these can also  facilitate the path for future British recognition of Palestine alongside Israel.”

Zac Lewis is a final year History and Politics student at the University of Warwick. He has a keen interest in politics and justice, both locally and internationally, and the importance of history to understanding contemporary phenomena.

As a British Jew, his project as part of the fellowship is focusing on the British Jewish community and their approaches towards British recognition of Palestine alongside Israel, as part of a two state solution, which most community organisations support.
“I am a proud British Jew, and my experience being brought up in this community has attuned me to the varying contours of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and my relationship to it. 

“This issue, though, is more than a concern for only those with ties of kinship to the region. Britain’s Balfour Declaration over 100 years ago, its mandate over Palestine, and continuing strategic relationships in the region, should ensure its importance to all British people. Britain has a historic responsibility, both moral and arguably legal, towards ensuring a just settlement to this conflict – and the Balfour Project is on the frontline of getting this message out there. 

“My personal project focuses inwards on how to build productive relationships within my own community on Israel-Palestine – especially with groups and individuals who work specifically in this area. It is a project that draws from my own upbringing and experience to hopefully further the cause of justice.”

Alexandre Lowe is a final year International Politics student at City, University of London. As a dual nationality French/ British holder with a very international background and enthusiastic about all things related to global politics, he wishes to breach the barrier between the academic world and the practical world by applying some of his knowledge in International relations, security, and conflict resolution.

His project as part of the fellowship is focusing on understanding and extricating the issue of Israel-Palestine from world politics, as well as researching possible relationships with other organisations involved with the conflict, specifically potential European allies we may be able to interact with both within and without the framework of the EU.

“I am interested in understanding the controversial ability of the conflict of remaining at the forefront of the world-stage and emotionally poignant for many. Additionally, the building of additional fruitful relationships with international partners can only aid in expanding the scope of awareness building that the Balfour Project strives for. The strengthening of these relationships within the EU can serve to form a stronger foundation for the challenges that lie ahead for all of us.”

“While there is no point denying that things may be looking grim, the global rise of populist politics as well as the looming menace of climate change are bound to alter the political realities for everyone. These new chaotic times will doubtlessly bring new opportunities and thus it is even more important that we strive to seek and understand all points of views, both old and new.”

Ed Pickthall is a recent graduate in Politics and International Relations from SOAS, University of London. His decision to study at SOAS was motivated by a desire to study the world through a less Western-centric lens. He has a keen interest in politics, with a focus on the Middle East and Britain’s historical relationship with the region, and the role that identity plays in international relations and the emergence of conflict.

He has spent time teaching English in the West Bank and has worked as a researcher for Parallel Histories, an interactive digital resource which seeks to teach both sides of disputed histories so students can better understand conflict. His project as part of the fellowship focuses on conservative arguments for recognition.

“A lesson I learnt living in the West Bank is that despite the 100 years which has passed since the Balfour Declaration it is still a fresh wound in the Palestinian national psyche – and a topic that will be brought up whenever one mentions they are British. In spite of this, few in Britain know of our historic role in the conflict and so it is important to raise awareness of Britain’s moral responsibility to those in the region and the symbolic power that recognition would bring.”

“My project focuses on the conservative case for the UK recognising Palestine. Following the 2019 election it became obvious that for there to be meaningful change in Britain’s position on Israel/Palestine there needs to be a shift in conservative opinion on the issue. However, I believe that it is also important that this issue should not just be seen as one for the Left to deal with. It is important that Britain lives up to its historic and moral responsibility towards ensuring a just settlement for the Israeli and Palestinian people, and that this should be cross-partisan.”

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